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Depression

 

Discussion

 

Depression is due to a chemical imbalance or a normal response to life events? Which is true? Probably both. Our bio-chemistry is changing all the time so logically after job-loss, relationship break-up, trauma, theft or too much stress for any reason we may well feel depressed.

Symptoms include lack of energy, difficulty sleeping, finding it hard to concentrate and sometimes thinking we are going crazy. Those who come to see me often say 'I'm not my normal self' or 'This is just not like me'.

What Can We Do?

 

One choice is to take so-called anti-depressant medication for the chemical imbalance as recommended by NICE (National Institute of Clinical Excellence) and, of course, drug companies. If this is your choice that's fine.

However, typically anti-depressant medication works on our serotonin metabolism and we do not know how this affects our mood. Some research shows the medication is no more effective than placebo (Kirsch et al, 2008). If your doctor prescribes anti-depressant medication and you think you'll feel better you do and that's great! Although nothing about our situation will have changed through taking medication we may have the energy needed to change things, or just carry on because it seems we can't do anything else.

Alternatively, neuroscience tells us that good relationships (not necessarily with a psychotherapist) can make an enormous difference to how we feel (Cozolino, 2006). Feelings of interest, joy and excitement are energy-full and a positive therapeutic goal can enable us to do what we need.

Sometimes we need a 'good-companion' and perhaps this is where I may help-just ring or email and we can have a chat about perhaps working together.

Phone: 0033 6 42 39 74 86

 

(References: Kirsch I, Deacon BJ, Huedo-Medina TB, Scoboria A, Moore TJ, et al. (2008) Initial Severity and Antidepressant Benefits: A Meta-Analysis of Data Submitted to the Food and Drug Administration. http://medicine.plosjournals.org/periserv/?request=get-document&doi=10.1371%Fjournal.pmed.005004&ct=1 Accessed 12 April 2008.

Cozolino, L. (2006). The Neuroscience of Human Relationships. New York: W. W. Norton Inc.)